What We’re Reading: The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery

“As the end of senior year approaches (…I’m not counting or anything), I was reminded of a book that I have grown up reading called “The Little Prince.” It is a story that can take on many meanings and themes, but one that I feel is fitting for us seniors is to not let go of your childhood, as well as the theme of friendships and how they are one of the most important relationships you can have.…

Blind Date With a Book: Faculty Edition

Looking for literary love? The OWU English Department has you covered. Blind Date With a Book is an annual Spring semester event for bookworms of any majors. It is coordinated by the English Department Student Board and Beeghly Library and is in its second year. Books beloved by students and English faculty are pulled from the library stacks, wrapped up like gifts and placed around the library’s Bayley Room with notecards of description on them.…

Blind Date With a Book: Student Board Edition

Looking for literary love? The OWU English Department has you covered. Blind Date With a Book is an annual Spring semester event for bookworms of any majors. It is coordinated by the English Department Student Board and Beeghly Library and is in its second year. Books beloved by students and English faculty are pulled from the library stacks, wrapped up like gifts and placed around the library’s Bayley Room with notecards of description on them.…

What We’re Reading: A Separate Peace by John Knowles

Recommended by Madison Williams.

A Separate Peace by John Knowles follows Gene Forrester, a 16 year old boy attending a prestigious boarding school during World War II. The novel details his close friendship with fellow boarder Finny. Their friendship quickly evolves from mutual admiration to intense rivalry culminating in a shocking event that explores the idea of moral ambiguity.…

Reading Through Black History Month

To celebrate Black History Month, Dr. Nancy Comorau (the resident postcolonial specialist of Sturges) teamed up with Kirsten Whitford and Carrie Kubicki (the resident Instagram gurus of Sturges) to share a book by a Black author every few days.

Books ranged from plays by Afro-Carribian British actors to volumes of poetry about being a Jamaican woman in the US to nonfiction works by journalists investigating the Black Lives Matter movement.…

The Box Man by Kobo Abe

Recommended by Madina Sargand

I wanted to read this summer and I love fiction, so when I got an email from Dr. Livingston with a list of recommended books and saw the title The Box Man, I knew this book would be really interesting. The Box Man is a story about a protagonist who quits his identity and the trappings of a normal life to live in a cardboard box: he wants to become a box man.…

M. Butterfly by David Henry Hwang

Recommended by Emily Shpiece

The play is a retelling of Giacomo Puccini’s Madame Butterfly in which a French ambassador, Rene Gallimard, falls in love with opera star Song Liling. They meet after Gallimard sees Liling portray the title role in Puccini’s opera and, inspired by his womanizing friend, Gallimard begins to test the limits of Liling’s confidence and pride believing that she, a Chinese woman, will eventually bend to his domineering Western position.…

Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist by Sunil Yapa

Recommended by Elizabeth Anderson

I read this novel on the back porch of my childhood home in a sleepy  suburb of the Pacific Northwest over the summer, and was struck by the nearby history that I had never learned. Your Heart is a Muscle the Size of a Fist is based on and takes place during the 1999 World Trade Organization protests in Seattle; its take on the historical facts of the event is painted by Yapa’s poignant, lyrical phrasing.…

Sacré Bleu: A Comedy d’Art by Christopher Moore

Recommended by Jordan Waterwash

Christopher Moore’s ability to transform history into fantastical comedies completely mystifies me every time I read one of his books. Sacré Bleu is no exception. I’ve always been a fan of art, so it seemed natural for me to read what I thought would be an interesting tale about the lives of made-up artists during the Impressionist period.…